Malaria Eradication in Nigeria

Doctor Sends Important Notice, One Major Step To Reduce Malaria

Doctor Sends Important Notice, One Major Step To Reduce Malaria in Nigeria.

See all the latest health news in Nigeria

Dr Ifeoma Okoye, a professor of Radiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka has sent an important notice on how to eradicate Malaria.

Professor Okoye who is also the Director of the University of Nigeria Centre for clinical trials said this step would reduce the invasion of mosquitoes into the house.

The oncologist who released an ‘Important Notice’ on World Malaria Day (WMD), said better quality housing is one step to reducing the manifestation of mosquitoes.

According to the medical director, this would help minimise the entry points of mosquitoes.

She said:

“Better-quality housing decreases the risk of malaria as it minimises entry points for mosquitoes during the night.

“Floors composed of earth bricks are also associated with lower malaria risk as inhabitants are more likely to sleep on raised beds to avoid ground moisture, in turn eluding bites from Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes which search for blood close to the ground.

“Electricity use was associated with an increased malaria risk, as the alternative of biomass fuel burning produces smoke that is thought to deter mosquitoes from entering houses.”

Dr Okoye, who is also the founder of a non-governmental organisation called Breast Without Spot, highlighted the impact of socioeconomic factors on Malaria.

See the impact of high socioeconomic factors she said would reduce malaria.

  • Piped borne water.
  • Better refuse collection.
  • Better education.
  • Higher exposure to Radio and Television campaigns.
  • Ability to afford prevention methods and treatments.

She explained:

“The higher socioeconomic status of urban dwellers is a major factor contributing to their reduced risk of contracting malaria within cities, socioeconomic factors contribute to increased transmission in poorer areas with slum-like conditions.”

Dr Okoye also spoke on the community and household responsibility in preventing the disease.

She continued:

“Better-quality housing decreases the risk of malaria as it minimises entry points for mosquitoes during the night.

“Floors composed of earth bricks are also associated with lower malaria risk as inhabitants are more likely to sleep on raised beds to avoid ground moisture, in turn eluding bites from Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes which search for blood close to the ground.

“Electricity use was associated with an increased malaria risk, as the alternative of biomass fuel burning produces smoke that is thought to deter mosquitoes from entering houses.”

Also, read the latest health news in Nigeria on the health implications of forcing infants to sit

“The higher socioeconomic status of urban dwellers is a major factor contributing to their reduced risk of contracting malaria within cities, socioeconomic factors contribute to increased transmission in poorer areas with slum-like conditions.”

 “Hygiene, sanitation, and waste collection are key determinants of malaria transmission which, while household responsibilities, have a community-level effect on disease transmission. 

“As an example, the more the households dispose of waste properly, the lower the risk of liquid waste collecting in pools of stagnant water and forming vector breeding sites. Toilets are also potential areas of mosquito activity, and septic tanks within.”

The doctor noted that all hands must be on deck in the fight against Malaria.

She advised:

“We should all learn ways to keep ourselves and others safe from malaria. 

“We should all maintain proper hygiene and keep our surroundings clean. If we work towards keeping every area clean, then we can conquer the disease.”

Must Read: Two Real Reasons Why An Already Pregnant Woman May Still Conceive

The 2022 World Malaria Day held on Monday, April 25. It is a day set aside to sensitize people about the mosquito-borne disease. It is organised by the WHO.

According to the World Health Organisation, ending malaria is crucial to:

  • Ending poverty.
  • Improving the health of millions.
  • Harnessing the potential of future generations.

Source: PUNCH Health Wise

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

%d bloggers like this: